Phase 3: Interpreting Information

Updated 13 hours 43 min ago

In Phase 3, I will be gathering, arranging, and interpreting information from various resources in advance to and throughout the entire trip. In Phase 0, I selected my topic and recorded useful advice from previous Microcampus participants. In the following Phase 1, I discussed about my prior knowledge and future expectations on my topic. 

Background Information (from Phase 1):

Yunan Information: Yunan is a mountain and plateau region located on the southwest border of China, encompassed by Sichuan, Guizhou, and Guangxi. Along the southeast and southwest, it shares borders with Laos, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Despite owning abundant natural resources, Yunan was underdeveloped and segregated until recent decades, for their central government lacked dominant power from political, religious, and ethnic differences between provinces. However, the status quo indicates that Yunan, although still unreformed, has clear evidence of contribution to political, economic, and cultural aspects of China. Around 6 percent of Yunan's lands are suitable for agriculture. The region's biggest food supply is rice, followed by corns, sweet potatoes, vegetables, sugarcane, and tea, which has a well-known reputation around the world.[1] Furthermore, Yunan is one of China's major producers of tobacco. Recently, developing tobacco industries, such as the Yuxi cigarette factory, have been integrating IT technologies to spur industrial production, change the management of enterprise within companies, and possibly influence the general public's opinions toward unconventional working systems. [2]

History of the Bai People:

Tourism in Yunan (Including Controversies): Dali, a region next to the Erhai Lake, is under development to attract tourists from all around the nation by incorporating fantasies of the tourists about the past. Dali officials have constructed travel sites to gratify people's willingness to experience the culture's history through a fictional replication of certain remnants. In fact, Dali is only one of the regions going under change to distinguish themselves with their competitors that could potentially attract more visitors. Heavenly Dragons, a novel by Jin Yong illustrates how readers could have fantasical, imaginative perceptions about Dali as claimed by Zhang Nan, a resident of Dali. He suggests that developers should take immediate actions to develop tourism through constructing tourist sites, such as creating a "City- That- Never-Sleeps" along the shores of Lake Erhai in which includes a karaoke building, a laser disk film theater, and a "Dali in Miniature". His seven other reconstruction guidelines all potentially stimulates tourists and encourages them to inundate themselves with fictional fantasies and realms of ancient Dali. 

Authenticity, Identity of the Hui: 

Development in Xizhou/Yunan: Approximately one-fourth of Yunan's population is categorized as urban, while the rest is rural. Instead of large, metropolitan buildings, Yunan has developed into a medium-sized city since the industrial growth of the late 20th century. Some of the most developed cities are Kunming, the capital, Geiju, a city famous for tin, Dali, a region along the borders of Tibet and Myanmar, and Kaiyuan, a coal mining and power generating center. [1]  Recently, developing tobacco industries, such as the Yuxi cigarette factory, have been integrating IT technologies to spur industrial production, change the management of enterprise within companies, and possibly influence the general public's opinions toward unconventional working systems. [2]

Globalization Around the World: 

 

Information from 3-to-5's: 

Information From Local Contacts: 

Answers to Previous Questions (from Phase 1): 

Sources: 

1. 

I am fourteen years old and this is my 10th year in China. I have lived in Beijing and Busan (South Korea) before in which I have attended four different schools. I am interested in meeting people who come from diverse cultures and backgrounds, and I am willing to use Microcampus as an opportunity to experience the life on the other side of China. I hope I can gain some more knowledge on the various perspectives people in Xizhou have towards the world, which would help me develop as a stronger, open-minded individual. I am looking forward to this valuable learning experience!